Diamonds in the Hill

Pictured above is my dad "walking me down the aisle" to the wedding altar on the shore where my husband, family and friends were waiting.

Pictured above is my dad "walking me down the aisle" to the wedding altar on the shore where my husband, family and friends were waiting.

I always tell my dad he should write a book. I'm biased, but I think his life is one of the most fascinating! Either it was, or he is just a good storyteller. Either way, it would make for a good book. I grew up hearing stories of all of his adventures, shenanigans, and dramas. From his motorcycle leading him away from his childhood in Utah to buying his land in trees and mountains of Washington State; to fishing and logging jobs throughout Alaska and Washington; to his house burning down and losing everything before we was thirty – I would say he is a self-made man. But he is the kind that always knew that his life and abundance was a gift. Probably because he didn't always have it. My brother and I are the product and living proof of a man who broke a painful cycle and culture of parenting that he experienced as a child. Partnered with our superhero and godsend mother, we were able to grow up with a foundation that can't be broken. One that has probably saved my life countless times. I didn't always understand this, but the more I face the boulders of life that could trip me up, I see what has continued to lift me.

My dad was a freelance logger when I was a baby and then worked for the Department of Natural Resources commercial thinning, fighting wildfires and re-planting trees as an Inmate Foreman. More recently, he was a timber-cruiser for Washington State. Aside from his jobs and probably on his jobs, he has been trying to find and beat the record for some of the worlds largest trees. Apart from the homesteaders who settled in my small hometown almost a century ago and who are no longer here, my dad probably knows the forest better than anyone. He built our house with it.

I knew the names of all the trees in our area by the time I was seven. I drove his stick-shift in the snow when I was nine. I knew how to ski and keep up with the boys by the time I was ten (after hitting a few trees). I knew how to be his crew in sailboat races when I was twelve. I could start a fire, cut firewood and run a chainsaw. Out of all the adventures I grew to love and be a part of because of my dad, the best thing he ever taught me was something he didn't even try to do.

It came from his love for hunting for crystals in the high country. More often than not, he'd find them (he says that they found him) and bring them home to his collection. He probably had and still has hundreds in plastic bags. Just one of his many crazy talents. I'd say that sometimes watching a person's actions or habits can teach you more than anything they could say to you. My mom was usually the one I would call when I needed advice and developed, saved and filled me in so many ways, but who my dad was impacted me in an equally important and vital way. In who he was, he taught me to always look for those crystals in life. On your bad days especially. Hold on to them, cherish them, and when you're led, use your crystals and blessings to bless other people. It can be easy to stop climbing, but always look for the diamonds in the hill.

Here's to good fathers. You have filled us more than you know.

xo

      Diamonds in the Hill

 
Some that come and some that go.
Kids grow up chasin' black balloons in the sky.
I compare everything I do and everyone I know to you,
'Cause I had one that showed up every time.
 
Your soul is the greenest soul I've ever seen,
And I've seen rain that brings you to your knees.
But you step up and you stand strong and still,
And you keep finding diamonds in the hill.
 
We'll be cruisn' through the woods, teachin' me life;
You're the reason I know when it's wrong or right.
Merry goes around, then I'm goin' getting married now.
You'll sail into the shore right by my side.
 
Captain of the boat, man of the trees,
I know you've battled shadows just like me.
You could stop climbing but you never will,
And you keep finding diamonds in the hill.
 
I never needed to superman to idolize, or search for real love all my life, cuz I had you, I had you.
You never spoke too rough, but you stoke up when times got tough, glad I had one like you.
Of all the girls put the world, I know if one's ever had one like you, one like you.
 
I think I see miles of you in me.
How I think and how I know what to believe.
'Cause I'll ride the wind, but when I'm standin' still,
I always look for diamonds in the hill.
Yeah, I'll ride the wind, but when I'm standin' still,
I always look for diamonds in the hill.

 

Alex MabeyComment